Garbage Factoids

01.19.02       12 volunteers        840 lbs
04.06.02       36 volunteers          2 tons
07.07.02     150 volunteers          4 tons
01.18. 03     100 volunteers          1 ton
04.25.03     200 volunteers         4 tons
07.06.03     300 volunteers         6 tons
01.23.04     130 volunteers         3 tons
04.25.04     150 volunteers         4 tons
07.05.04     400 volunteers         8 tons
01.15.05     100 volunteers          3 tons
04.23.05     150 volunteers      2.5 tons
07.05.05     200 volunteers      7.5 tons
01.21.06     150 volunteers          5 tons
04.22.06     250 volunteers         4 tons
07.05.06     350 volunteers      4.5 tons
01.13.07    135 volunteers           3 tons
04.21.07    150 volunteers           3 tons
07.05.07    500 volunteers        10 tons
01.26.08    200 volunteers          2 tons
04.26.08    300 volunteers          3 tons
07.05.08    500+volunteers   17.5 tons
01.31.09    450 volunteers           8 tons
 04.0?.09    ? volunteers            6.5 tons
07.05.09    ? volunteers              18 tons        
01.04.10    300 volunteers           4 tons
04.0?.10    350 volunteers            3 tons
07.05.10    750 volunteers         20 tons
01.22.11    300 volunteers            4 tons
04.23.11    350 volunteers        7.5 tons
07.05.11    600 volunteers          15 tons
01.21.12    200 volunteers        6.5 tons
04.21.12    350 volunteers        4.5 tons
 07.05.12    700 volunteers        10 tons
01.20.13    450 volunteers        3.5 tons
04.20.13    325 volunteers           3 tons
07.05.13    1000 volunteers      19 tons
01.18.14    250 volunteers            3 ton *
234 tons thus far are off our beaches and out of our waters!
*work parties (who we are forever grateful to) have cleaned the north end of the peninsula nearly daily for over a year, lowering the overall volume collected during organized group cleanups.  
 
  • It takes up to 1000 volunteers to do each cleanup of the Long Beach Peninsula’s 28-mile stretch of ocean beaches.
  • 60-80% of all marine debris comes from land-based sources, such as the trash caught in storm drains or blown away from beaches and streets where people fail to pick it up. There is a great deal of helpful information about the various types of debris at: http://www.coastsavers.org/resources.html
  • Fishermen (recreational and commercial) lose things (such as fishing line and rope) at sea or toss debris overboard where it is either eaten by marine and bird life or is carried by ocean movement to land.
  • Balloons look lovely as they float in the sky, but they become little bits of plastic when they deflate and are often eaten by birds which mistake them for food.
  • Plastics are the most notorious for marine wildlife destruction. For example, the large, heavy- mil plastic bags dumped at sea can cover a 4- foot- square area of sand, which stops the food supply from reaching the razor clams in the sand below the bag!
  • Every piece of plastic ever created still exists! Click here to view: Plastics Never Go Away”
  • http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080506/MULTIMEDIA02/80505016
  • Cigarette butts live on for about one year before they disintegrate, while some cigarette filters take a much longer time before they are no longer visible as small, light-colored items in the sand.
  •  Bottle caps never do disintegrate and can be found littering streets, washing into storm drains, thrown about on beaches. While their colors may fade, they remain brightly colored for many years.
  • Fireworks create a tremendous amount of plastic bits, especially during the Fourth of July holiday.